Posts Tagged native americans

Muddy Waters Has Gone to Press

May 6th, 2012 Posted in coming soon, new releases, PRODUCT SPOTLIGHT, Publishing News | Comments Off on Muddy Waters Has Gone to Press

Muddy-WatersMuddy Waters: an insider’s view of North American Native Spirituality by Canadian Cree author Nanci Des Gerlaise has gone to press. – Back from press on May 28th. Order your copy today.

A warning to Native and Non-Native Christian believers alike . . . and a call to those Involved in Native Spirituality, the New Age, or occultism

Book Information: ISBN: 9780984636648 232 Pages, Retail $13.95

Table of Contents and Preface

Is the “Great Spirit” the same as the Holy Spirit of the Bible? * * What are Native Spirituality practices such as, vision quests, shamanism, sweat lodge ceremonies, dream catchers * * What is the Native “Renewal”? * * Can cultures be redeemed? * * How Native Spirituality & the Emerging Church Are on the Same Path

Description: Many Christians see no problem combining the beliefs and practices of Native American Spirituality with their view of Christianity. But Nanci Des Gerlaise knows differently. Raised on a Metis settlement with fifteen brothers and sisters, Nanci’s childhood and young adult life was riddled with terrors that come with being the daughter and granddaughter of medicine men. Muddy Waters tells the story of this Cree Native American woman, who after years of struggle, oppression, and spiritual darkness found light and truth in the One who offered her freedom.

But Muddy Waters is not just a biography. It delves deeply into the framework of Native Spirituality. While Native American Christians are looking for a great spiritual awakening within the First Nations/Native American groups–by incorporating Native Spirituality practices into their Christianity–right under their noses, a massive worldwide deception is swiftly surging forward. Partly in overcompensation for very real injustices committed against Native Americans, Native Spirituality has become politically correct inasmuch as traditional biblical Christianity is on a fast track to becoming politically incorrect. Sadly, in the process, the Gospel, which is “the power of God unto salvation” (Romans 1:16) is being pushed aside, as if it were to blame–leaving countless numbers of people–both Native American and non-Native–without the sure hope that only comes through knowing Jesus Christ. Click here to order this book.

 

Excerpt: Stories from Indian Wigwams and Northern Campfires

May 2nd, 2011 Posted in Excerpts | Comments Off on Excerpt: Stories from Indian Wigwams and Northern Campfires

Stories-From-Indian-Wigwams-and-Northern-CampfiresMissionary work among the Indians, like that in all lands, has its hours of sadness and discouragement as well as of hope and rejoicing. We look back with thankfulness that it was not only our privilege to go forth weeping, bearing the precious seed, but that in addition the Master of the harvest gave us the joy of the reapers. It was our great happiness to see “many a sheaf both ripe and golden” gathered in. The work was one of peculiar hardships to both Mrs. Young and myself, but the conversion of scores of souls every year amply repaid us for the sufferings and anxieties of that life so isolated and lonely as it must necessarily be in mission fields so far from civilization. Many encouraging incidents were constantly occurring to cheer the hearts of the lonely toilers and to stimulate them to labor on in the blessed work. It is a joy to record some of these trophies won not only through our own feeble instrumentality, but also through the loving, consecrated efforts of our loved brother missionaries. One of these dear brethren, writing, says:

“A young Indian who was very sick had his friends bring him twenty-five miles to the home of the missionary. He wept when he came into his presence, and said he wanted to learn about Jesus before he died. He said, ‘I am very wicked, and I want to get a new heart.’ When urged to pray he replied, ‘I can’t pray; I don’t know how.’ The faithful missionary, with a conscious sense of the nearness and infinite compassion of the Divine One, earnestly pointed him to the Lamb of God. Next day, when the missionary called upon him, the poor sick man, holding out his hand, exclaimed with rapture, ‘Jesus has heard my prayer and made my heart good. Now pray for wife also.’ He began from that time to recover from his sickness, and a few days later his wife also accepted Christ as her Saviour, and now both are rejoicing in Jesus.”

A beautiful story is told by one of our earlier Indian missionaries of a proud and powerful chief who, under the preaching of the Gospel, became deeply convicted of sin. Trembling under a sense of his guilt, he came to the missionary and offered him his much-prized belt of wampum to have his load of guilt removed. When told that the Lord Jesus did not want this offering he went away very sad and depressed in spirit. Soon after he returned and offered his gun and favorite dog. “These are not what Christ wants,” said the missionary. Again he went away sorrowful, but after a time he returned and offered his wigwam and family. The faithful missionary, who saw the struggle that was going on in his heart, refused for his Master even these, saying that “the Saviour could not accept even these as a sacrifice for sin.” The poor convicted, half -despairing Indian then threw himself down upon the ground, and, lifting up his tearful eyes, exclaimed, “Here, Lord, I can do no more. Please take poor Indian too.” The answer of peace and pardon was not long in coming.

Many more delightful instances could be given of the Gospel’s power to save even the poor Indian. We give more fully in detail the story of the conversion of Joe. It has been made a blessing to many. We trust the placing it here on record will cause it to be a stimulus and blessing to many more. How true it is that it is not always that the greatest results for God are obtained when the surroundings are most favorable! The crowded, enthusiastic audience does not always yield the greatest number of converts. How often has it been seen by the faithful minister or devoted Sunday-school teacher that their work seemed specially owned of God when under difficulties and discouragements they sacrificed self and personal comfort to be in their place and do their duty!

Many can look back to some cold, wet Sunday or other apparently very unfavorable time, from the human stand-point, when, because they were in their place, precious immortal souls were then influenced by the truth and heartily, believingly accepted Christ as their personal, conscious Saviour. Little did I dream, as I stood up before the little company on that Dakota prairie and preached that short, simple sermon, that it was to be one of the successful sermons of my life. (from chapter IX of Stories from Indian Wigwams and Northern Campfires by Egerton Ryerson Young, Lighthouse Trails, 2011, Retail: $15.95)

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